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Love extends beyond the grave in this strange and marvellous story

Past Exhibition

Kate Beynon

AN-LI: A CHINESE GHOST TALE

Kate Beynon’s new body of work is inspired by a supernatural Chinese tale of two young spirits who traverse two worlds; one magically aquatic, the other earthly. Beynon has imagined the guiding spirit of the goddess Kwan Yin as their paths lead from tragedy to transformation, hope and healing.

The works were commissioned by Art and Australia for a new hardcover publication, An-Li: A Chinese Ghost Tale, edited by Laura Murray Cree, which includes the tale alongside colour reproductions of the works in this exhibition.

The exhibition features works on paper, paintings, an animated video and a suspended sculptural installation. The works draw on diverse source material including Chinese and Japanese traditional imagery, Taoist magic calligraphy blended with influences from contemporary comic book graphics, film, animation and fashion. Informed by ancestral imaginings, family connections and travel, the project continues Beynon’s interest in exploring aspects of transcultural life, feminisms and notions of hybridity in dealing with a ‘mixed up’ and precarious world.

 

BACK TO PAST EXHIBITION

Past Exhibition

Kate Beynon

28 March - 8 June 2015

AN-LI: A CHINESE GHOST TALE

Kate Beynon’s new body of work is inspired by a supernatural Chinese tale of two young spirits who traverse two worlds; one magically aquatic, the other earthly. Beynon has imagined the guiding spirit of the goddess Kwan Yin as their paths lead from tragedy to transformation, hope and healing.

The works were commissioned by Art and Australia for a new hardcover publication, An-Li: A Chinese Ghost Tale, edited by Laura Murray Cree, which includes the tale alongside colour reproductions of the works in this exhibition.

The exhibition features works on paper, paintings, an animated video and a suspended sculptural installation. The works draw on diverse source material including Chinese and Japanese traditional imagery, Taoist magic calligraphy blended with influences from contemporary comic book graphics, film, animation and fashion. Informed by ancestral imaginings, family connections and travel, the project continues Beynon’s interest in exploring aspects of transcultural life, feminisms and notions of hybridity in dealing with a ‘mixed up’ and precarious world.