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Past Exhibition

Kate Rohde: flourish

Blending the lavishness of the Baroque and Rococo period with her interests in Natural History Kate Rohde conjures scenes from a world not too dissimilar from our own in her new work flourish. Having recently returned from a studio residency at Paris’s Cite Internationale des arts complex and visiting some of Europe’s niche private museums, Kate Rohde, brought the elaborate traditions and landscaping of European gardens to TarraWarra Museum of Art.

Using the four seasons as the thematic base for the project, Rohde will transform the gallery space with curlicue designed hedges, elaborate dioramic vitrines and haunting paper mâché sculptures. Each of the four seasons will be investigated and interpreted using Rohde’s fanciful and curious designs. Adapting a variety of natural and man-made products Rohde also investigated her preoccupation with nature verses design. The natural and native setting of the TarraWarra Museum of Art in the Yarra Valley provided an interesting contrast to the Rohde’s interpretation of the highly manipulated gardening traditions of Europe.

The creation of this new work was assisted by Arts Victoria.

BACK TO PAST EXHIBITION

Past Exhibition

Kate Rohde: flourish

20 April - 20 July 2008

Blending the lavishness of the Baroque and Rococo period with her interests in Natural History Kate Rohde conjures scenes from a world not too dissimilar from our own in her new work flourish. Having recently returned from a studio residency at Paris’s Cite Internationale des arts complex and visiting some of Europe’s niche private museums, Kate Rohde, brought the elaborate traditions and landscaping of European gardens to TarraWarra Museum of Art.

Using the four seasons as the thematic base for the project, Rohde will transform the gallery space with curlicue designed hedges, elaborate dioramic vitrines and haunting paper mâché sculptures. Each of the four seasons will be investigated and interpreted using Rohde’s fanciful and curious designs. Adapting a variety of natural and man-made products Rohde also investigated her preoccupation with nature verses design. The natural and native setting of the TarraWarra Museum of Art in the Yarra Valley provided an interesting contrast to the Rohde’s interpretation of the highly manipulated gardening traditions of Europe.

The creation of this new work was assisted by Arts Victoria.