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Past Exhibition

Judy Watson

the scarifier

Judy Watson’s Aboriginal matrilineal family are from Waanyi country in north-west Queensland and her process involves working with stories and memories of Indigenous Country. Watson has created a specially commissioned new installation in response to the Museum’s location in the Yarra Valley. Following lines of emotional and physical topography that centre on particular places and moments in time, she has focused on the history of Coranderrk Aboriginal Station near Healesville (1863- 1924). In conversation with Wurundjeri woman Brooke Collins, and with the permission of Aunty Joy Murphy Wandin AO to reproduce the Fred Kruger photographs of Coranderrk, Watson has considered the impact of hops production on those living at the Station. In addition, she considers the minutes of evidence, a documentation of the 1881 Parliamentary Inquiry into conditions and management at Coranderrk. Watson’s new paintings invoke both the detailed work of the scarifier as it followed the plough and incised the landscape, along with the topographic view of Country. The installation captures an intimate and powerful evocation of daily life at Coranderrk. In combination with the Museum’s Panorama exhibition, Judy Watson’s installation provides a creative perspective on the memories, scars and psychological impact of the relationship between Indigenous people and the colonial landscape.

BACK TO PAST EXHIBITION

Past Exhibition

Judy Watson

12 March - 31 July 2016

the scarifier

Judy Watson’s Aboriginal matrilineal family are from Waanyi country in north-west Queensland and her process involves working with stories and memories of Indigenous Country. Watson has created a specially commissioned new installation in response to the Museum’s location in the Yarra Valley. Following lines of emotional and physical topography that centre on particular places and moments in time, she has focused on the history of Coranderrk Aboriginal Station near Healesville (1863- 1924). In conversation with Wurundjeri woman Brooke Collins, and with the permission of Aunty Joy Murphy Wandin AO to reproduce the Fred Kruger photographs of Coranderrk, Watson has considered the impact of hops production on those living at the Station. In addition, she considers the minutes of evidence, a documentation of the 1881 Parliamentary Inquiry into conditions and management at Coranderrk. Watson’s new paintings invoke both the detailed work of the scarifier as it followed the plough and incised the landscape, along with the topographic view of Country. The installation captures an intimate and powerful evocation of daily life at Coranderrk. In combination with the Museum’s Panorama exhibition, Judy Watson’s installation provides a creative perspective on the memories, scars and psychological impact of the relationship between Indigenous people and the colonial landscape.